translate login logout search newsletter bright-stars school-lunches calendar our-school

Header

School Logo

St Paul's C of E Primary School

Heathside Grove

LEARNING to make a difference

The National Curriculum 2014

The New National Curriculum came into existence in September 2014.

 

Pupils of compulsory school age in community and foundation schools, including community special schools and foundation special schools, and in voluntary aided and voluntary controlled schools must follow the national curriculum. It is organised on the basis of four key stages and twelve subjects, classified in legal terms as ‘core’ and ‘other foundation’ subjects.

The Core subjects are English, Mathematics and Science. The other foundations subject taught are History, Geography, Art&Design, Computing, Physical Education, Music, Design & Technology and Languages. Please use the following link to the The New National Curriculum.

 

The national curriculum is just one element in the education of every child. There is time and space in the school day and in each week, term and year to range beyond the national curriculum specifications. The national curriculum provides an outline of core knowledge around which teachers can develop exciting and stimulating lessons to promote the development of pupils’ knowledge, understanding and skills as part of the wider school curriculum. 

 

If you would like to know more about your child's learning then please speak to the class teacher.

 

Every state-funded school must offer a curriculum which is balanced and broadly based and which:

  • promotes the spiritual, moral, cultural, mental and physical development of pupils at the school and of society, and

  • prepares pupils at the school for the opportunities, responsibilities and experiences of later life

A wide range of pupils have special educational needs, many of whom also have disabilities. Lessons are be planned to ensure that there are no barriers to every pupil achieving. In many cases, such planning will mean that these pupils will be able to study the full national curriculum. The SEN Code of Practice will include advice on approaches to identification of need which can support this. A minority of pupils will need access to specialist equipment and different approaches. The SEN Code of Practice will outline what needs to be done for them.

 

Reading  Throughout the school the pre-dominant reading scheme which is used mainly for home readers is Oxford Reading Tree and Oxford Literacy Webb. These are supplemented by a range of books from Ginn, Soundstart and free reading books which are available for the most able readers. A whole new set of books have been purchased to compliment this scheme from ORT which are modern, up-to date and link directly into the new curriculum. For guided reading a range of books have been purchased which either link in to the class topic or are specific to genres. All these new books are now book banded to ensure that pupils are reading at the correct ability level with just the right amount of challenge.

 

Phonics – From the moment our pupils enter our nursery class we introduce them to our Phonics programme of ‘Letters & Sounds’. Letters and Sounds is a phonics resource published by the Department for Education and Skills in 2007. It aims to build children's speaking and listening skills in their own right as well as to prepare children for learning to read by developing their phonic knowledge and skills. It sets out a detailed and systematic programme for teaching phonic skills for children starting by the age of five, with the aim of them becoming fluent readers by age seven.

 

Phase

Phonic Knowledge and Skills

Phase One(Nursery/Reception)

Activities are divided into seven aspects, including environmental sounds, instrumental sounds, body sounds, rhythm and rhyme, alliteration, voice sounds and finally oral blending and segmenting.

Phase Two(Reception) up to 6 weeks

Learning 19 letters of the alphabet and one sound for each. Blending sounds together to make words. Segmenting words into their separate sounds. Beginning to read simple captions.

Phase Three(Reception) up to 12 weeks

The remaining 7 letters of the alphabet, one sound for each. Graphemes such as ch, oo, th representing the remaining phonemes not covered by single letters. Reading captions, sentences and questions. On completion of this phase, children will have learnt the "simple code", i.e. one grapheme for each phoneme in the English language.

Phase Four(Reception) 4 to 6 weeks

No new grapheme-phoneme correspondences are taught in this phase. Children learn to blend and segent longer words with adjacet consonants, e.g. swim, clap, jump.

Phase Five(Throughout Year 1)

Now we move on to the "complex code". Children learn more graphemes for the phonemes which they already know, plus different ways of pronouncing the graphemes they already know.

Phase Six(Throughout Year 2 and beyond)

Working on spelling, including prefixes and suffixes, doubling and dropping letters etc.

 

Top